Dienstag, 26. August 2014

Waiting for Mac DeMarco III

Mac DeMarco was a notorious funman whose short temper and a tendency to drool earned him the nickname Mac Dog. He was quick on the trigger and bragged that he'd killed 88 men. However, this can not be substantiated since precise records were not kept after DeMarco shot a prophet who published an unfavorable story about him in 2014.



»What was I saying, we could go on from there.« »What were you saying when?« »At the very beginning.« »The beginning of what?« »This evening...« »I'm not an historian.« »Wait... we embraced... we were happy... what do we do now that we're happy... go on waiting... waiting... let me think... it's coming... let me see... ah! The tree!« »The tree?« »Do you not remember?« »I'm tired.« »Look at it.« They look at the tree. 

Zara Thustra's eye had perceived that a certain youth avoided her. And as she walked alone one evening over the hills, behold, there found she the youth sitting leaning against a tree, and gazing with wearied look into the valley. Zara Thustra thereupon laid hold of the tree beside which the youth sat, and spoke thus: „I've never seen you before in my life, but you look to me like a slacker.“

When Zara Thustra had said this, the youth called out with violent gestures: „Why don't you make like a tree and get out of here!“ „It's leave, you idiot! Make like a tree and leave. You sound like a damn fool when you say it wrong! Shape up, man, you're a slacker. You wanna be a slacker for the rest of your life? You don't want to crash into some tree that once existed in the past.“

And Zara Thustra contemplated the tree beside which they stood, and spoke thus: „You see this book? This book tells the future.“ „Do I become like a rich pop star?“ „Yeah, it's got a beat and you can dance to it. That is not the worst taste in these days. I divine thee well: Thou hast become the enchanter of all the world; but for thyself thou hast no lie or artifice left, thou art disenchanted to thyself!“

Here the youth was silent. Here, however, Zara Thustra could no longer restrain herself: „You got a real attitude problem, MacFly. It's all in the past.“ „You mean in the future?“ „Where could future and past be closer together than with thee? For this is the secret of the song: Two roads come together here. If my calculations are correct, when this baby hits 33 rounds per minute, you're gonna hear some serious shit.

And those into whose ears thou hast at any time dripped thy song: A truth which only glideth into fine ears, he calleth false hood and trumpery. Verily, he believeth only in Godots that make a great noise in the world!“ Here paused Zara Thustra awhile. Then Zara Thustra continued to speak thus and her voice had changed.„I suppose it's poetic justice“, said she and stroked her beard. „Two MacFlys with the same fun.“

All this went on for a long time, or a short time: for properly speaking, there is no time on earth for such things. "We have not yet time for Zara Thustra" so they object; but what matter about a time that "hath no time" for Zara Thustra? Away with such a Godot, better to have no Godot, better to set up destiny on one's own account!

»Where was I... How's your foot?« »Swelling visibly.« »Ah yes, the two thieves. Do you remember the story?« »No.« »Shall I tell it to you?« »No.« »It'll pass the time.« »No.« »Make a note of this: Waiting for Mac DeMarco I & II.« »Who believes him?« »Everybody. It's the only version they know.« »It's a scandal!« 

Thus began Zara Thustra's down-going. 

Composed of
Back to the Future
Waiting for Godot, Samuel Beckett
Thus spoke Zarathustra, Friedrich Nietzsche

Donnerstag, 14. August 2014

Thus spoke Nietzsche :::

The fundamental idea of my work namely, the Eternal Recurrence of all things this highest of all possible formulas of a Yea-saying philosophy, first occurred to me in August, 1881. I made a note of the thought on a sheet of paper, with the postscript: 6,000 feet beyond men and time! That day I happened to be wandering through the woods alongside of the lake of Silvaplana, and I halted beside a huge, pyramidal and towering rock not far from Surlei. It was then that the thought struck me. Looking back now, I find that exactly two months previous to this inspiration, I had had an omen of its coming in the form of a sudden and decisive alteration in my tastes more particularly in music. It would even be possible to consider all Zarathustra as a musical composition. At all events, a very necessary condition in its production was a renaissance in myself of the art of hearing. In a small mountain resort (Recoaro) near Vicenza, where I spent the spring of 1881, I and my friend and Maestro, Peter Cast also one who had been born again discovered that the phoenix music that hovered over us, wore lighter and brighter plumes than it had done theretofore.———